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Old 05-18-2008, 01:27 PM   #1
Disillusionist
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Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

I'm currently at a game that has player crafting, and offers the ability to make unique items.
I'm of two minds on this, being that quality control (spelling/grammar, lore deviation, or an item's descript that goes well above its actual capability) is an issue, while on the other hand, that player creativity is to be welcomed and enjoyed.

My current game has a policy, as I understand it, of self and player regulation (with staff oversight, of course), and a general trust of players to stay 'in bounds' during creation and of other players to monitor and adjust quality control issues. Much like some games allow an enormous amount of freedom in character description creations, not requiring a great deal of attention to staff-run alterers or merchants for unique displays.

Some games use menu-driven crafting, wherein quality control (or other 'control' issues) is paramount, and only certain descriptors are allowed. Presuming (heh, which I don't, having seen my fair share of staff-driven typos in alters) that the issue of spelling/grammar and lore adherence is dealt with, the option is to sacrifice player creativity.

My personal preference is to give the players the benefit of the doubt, and allow as much creative freedom as possible. Roleplayers -tend- to be fairly creative in nature, and it seems to me that stifling the creative impulse overmuch is detrimental to creative enjoyment. In menu-driven systems, one's creativity would generally be limited by someone else's creative limitations, which can range from brilliant to utterly mundane.

If there are other types of crafting out there, what systems have you seen?
What is your general take on the benefits and drawbacks of them?
What is your preference?

Last edited by Disillusionist : 05-18-2008 at 01:29 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 05-18-2008, 03:26 PM   #2
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

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Originally Posted by Disillusionist View Post
My personal preference is to give the players the benefit of the doubt, and allow as much creative freedom as possible. Roleplayers -tend- to be fairly creative in nature, and it seems to me that stifling the creative impulse overmuch is detrimental to creative enjoyment. In menu-driven systems, one's creativity would generally be limited by someone else's creative limitations, which can range from brilliant to utterly mundane.
With the obvious caveat that the benefits of the system are tied to the type of game you're playing, one thing I don't like about restring systems (i.e., where the player asks the staff to restring an item description, or sets the description themself) is that is becomes difficult to tie the description into the world model. Unfortunately one of the benefits of a mud (over a MMO say) is that staff can respond to restring requests fairly efficiently, so I realize that by eliminating restrings you're kind of hamstringing an inherent advantage of muds over other types of MMOs.

Also you need a description system that reacts to the world model in the first place to accomplish this -- but if you go into the design of your game with the idea that you will allow restrings, then your design is going to be shaped by this assumption.

Now for something like mush-style RP, restrings are a no-brainer.

But if you're doing something, for lack of a better phrase, 'more gamey', I would go for more of a parameter-based crafting system, where the player chooses materials, effects, and so on and the system produces the description of the object. Given enough paramters you should still have a great deal of creative latitude. The added benefit is that the new object and the game world will mesh thematically (and possibly produce happy synergies that add to the theme), and the object can respond to the world model (easily getting wet, burnt, honed, burnished, responding to properties of other characters for identification, lore, etc. -- the possibilities are endless). This is not to say that in a RP environment players can't agree by contract that an object is responding to the world model, and possibly they can restring on the fly. But for a lot of these little effects I think it's more interesting to let the system handle the details.
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Old 05-20-2008, 01:32 PM   #3
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

We do both restrings and crafted items in 4D, but we still retain quality and no-cheat control over the items.

Over the years I have learned that giving the players 'the benefit of doubt' is a bit naive, at least when it comes to the ability of creating powerful items. If you allow them to choose their own stats, the majority, if not all, will go for maximum, which will soon make all existing equipment in the Mud obsolete and probably unbalance the game too. And as for the spelling and grammar of some players... well, imms may make the odd typo too, but at least with them you have some guarantee of the standard of writing.

What we are offering our players when it comes to Crafting are two things:

The first one is the option to 'buy' restringed items. The prize in Mud currency is dependent on the type, either you can buy a totally stat-less RP item just for show, or you can get a new item made from an existing one, with the same stats as the original. In both the cases the players write the descs themselves, and then note or mail them to an imm, who makes the actual item. In this way both creativity and security are satisfied.

The second feature is a Craft system that we are in the process of implementing. It allows the players to craft weapons, armor and some other items, based on a step-by-step system, where you have to gather the raw materials and process them in various ways, before you can make the actual item. In this system the end productss are all pre-made, but the quality is dependent on the material for certain parts, colour, decorations, finishing and of course the crafter's own skill. To avoid crafted items competing with the ones in the game, you can only craft armour or clothes for certain wear_locs, which are only used for crafter things.
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Old 05-20-2008, 03:46 PM   #4
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

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W

The first one is the option to 'buy' restringed items. The prize in Mud currency is dependent on the type, either you can buy a totally stat-less RP item just for show, or you can get a new item made from an existing one, with the same stats as the original. In both the cases the players write the descs themselves, and then note or mail them to an imm, who makes the actual item. In this way both creativity and security are satisfied.
You don't even need to make imms create the actual item. Why not have players submit items that they propose to create for approval before they're created? Takes an extra step out of things for the imm when the imm can just go down a list checking 'yes' or 'no' (with a short explanation as to what was wrong with the item).

For instance, in Achaea items are made from patterns, and you need to submit a new pattern for approval before an item can be created from it. The admins thus never have to make the items (which come with various commodity costs for each item created) but still retain pre-approval powers over crafted item descriptions.

--matt
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Old 05-19-2010, 09:07 PM   #5
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

NWA has a large amount of player created crafting in the form of clothing and jewelry but this is only available to two guilds (one in each main area) these guilds are also the only ones who can modify playes descs, modify ships and rooms and many other peices of palyer generated content... this way is easier to police as there can be IC guild rules on what is permitted and what isnt. A customer can design the item for you (and write it on a parchment) but the merchant or traider has to create it and will refuse if its not allowed.....

it must be said that nothing created with this much flexibility has any major stats.... they are mainly prestigious items... all amour and weapon manufacture done by merchants and traiders (not much) is a normal coded power and cant be changed,

things like ships have an unchangible type, dinghy skiff sloop yacht etc which allow for differnt things (fishing, whaling etc).. the actual descriptions can be changed but not the stats. whch prevents abuse
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Old 09-21-2010, 09:23 AM   #6
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

The crafting system on Armageddon's pretty much my favorite out of all I've seen.

It's not exactly what I'd call perfect, but I still dig it pretty hard.

It's cool beans, you have a raw, unworked item and you have a crafting skill-- type "craft item" to see what you can make out of the unworked item with your various crafting skills and their respective skill levels. You'll get a little list you can choose from, if you've got a few crafting skills or high skill levels.

Type in "craft <item> into <finished product>", and, depending on your skill, you'll either fail to make your finished product, or successfully make your finished product.


That's for common items that anyone with the skill can craft though....

For completely new objects that have never-been-seen-before-in-game, you've gotta talk to the Staff about that.... They do it pretty regularly, but only if you've completely maxed out your particular crafting skill.
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Old 09-21-2010, 10:00 AM   #7
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

I have never touched on crafting, and never fancied it, but discovered it quite by accident in Primordiax when armour was low in stock and I needed armour for my combat class.

Crafting in Primordiax is broken down into skills, each character level gives you a certain amout of skill points to spend. This means no one crafter can specialise in everything. There are four main crafting proffessions, armoursmith, weaponsmith, tailor, cooks, with alchemist and tinkers to follow soon. Each of these proffesion can touch on the others as they have primary skills, secondary skills and hobbies.

Example, a level 10 armourcrafter can have up to level 10 in armour crafting skills, up to level 6 in secondary skills (i.e dabbling in weapons crafting or cooking) and level 2 in hobbies (allowing training of combat skills, or healing or magic).

Armour crafting can be either leather, chain, or plate with each of those subsets breaking down further into head, legs, chest, etc)

You gain recipes, which require a certain amount of skill points to understand, and these recipes need resources in the form of raw metals, leather, wood, or for cooking raw ingrediants and herbs. The raw ingrediants can be gathered by all chracters as everyone is allowed to skin, mine, gather, chop etc. These resources are then processed to remove any taint (void taint is part of Primordiax;s history and has resulted in 2/3'rd of the world being uninhabitable.

Crafting is then carried out like 'combat' with the item having a certain amount of life that needs to be removed before you pass out from exhaustion.

In place of armour, you have crafting gear such as aprons, instead of weapons you have crafting tools of various quality, instead of special attacks you have to combat such things as fatigue (using annealing), clumping in food (by mixing).

This combat method allows crafters to group together and make joint projects.

Gear can be produced for practice as in Primordiax, but as is proper for finite resources this gear can then be salvaged breaking it back down into a percentage of the original raw resources.

Normally crafting needs the making of components (handles, blades, plates, dough's, batters) which can be done for low levels, or is usually passed onto low level apprentices (i.e other players) to do, whereas end products (plate armour, war axe, scrambled eggs) are classed as 'elite' monsters. Currently, Primordiax is in the bronze age of production, with iron on the horizon.

The system is alwasy evolving, but even in its present form it is quite attractive a prospect even to people who prefer hack and slash.

Last edited by MudMann : 09-21-2010 at 04:33 PM. Reason: Bad typos
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Old 09-27-2010, 04:01 PM   #8
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

The biggest challenge to crafting is the concept of uniqueness and how to cheat to get there We are currently working to deepen our crafting system so this has been a helpful read -- thanks to all participants.

It's the first time I've heard of the 'battle with an item' idea. It sounds like a neat way to throw in some randomness and make sure the whole process takes time. It's a clever move all in all but it sounds complicated and difficult to pull off well. Unless it is the main highlight of a MUD, I don't think it would be worth trying it on for us.

We are building up on a pretty conventional crafting system, a set of skills that turn PK arena trophies into a limited set of wearable items. The goal is both to increase the pool of raw materials and products, and to make sure that there's something unique about each product (therein lies the rub).

I have to say that as an English teacher I shudder to think of opening item strings to players. A great balance seems to be user submissions passing a screening process. We're already doing that for quest ideas and I think we can carry it over for crafting.

Letting players control the power of the product is, I think, pointless unless the penalty for failure offsets the rewards for success. Even if there is reciprocal punishment and successes are few, game balance will eventually slip away from control, I think.
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Old 09-27-2010, 08:32 PM   #9
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

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The biggest challenge to crafting is the concept of uniqueness and how to cheat to get there We are currently working to deepen our crafting system so this has been a helpful read -- thanks to all participants.

It's the first time I've heard of the 'battle with an item' idea. It sounds like a neat way to throw in some randomness and make sure the whole process takes time. It's a clever move all in all but it sounds complicated and difficult to pull off well. Unless it is the main highlight of a MUD, I don't think it would be worth trying it on for us.

We are building up on a pretty conventional crafting system, a set of skills that turn PK arena trophies into a limited set of wearable items. The goal is both to increase the pool of raw materials and products, and to make sure that there's something unique about each product (therein lies the rub).

I have to say that as an English teacher I shudder to think of opening item strings to players. A great balance seems to be user submissions passing a screening process. We're already doing that for quest ideas and I think we can carry it over for crafting.

Letting players control the power of the product is, I think, pointless unless the penalty for failure offsets the rewards for success. Even if there is reciprocal punishment and successes are few, game balance will eventually slip away from control, I think.
Well on that score, its best not to be too restrictive and just keep a log of what is created for typo purposes or use a method of 'if you dont treat the item with IC respect you will lose it or waste resources". Example with the same game Primordiax, has a clothing machine which is another type of crafting.

It allows for the total unfrestricted creation of wearable items. You get to decide where it is worn, if it is on or over, how transparent it is, how warm it is, the ASCII colour, does it cover more than one part of the body (an apron would cover chest, top of legs for example), can it be worn under something and if so how visibile it is if it is. You can create a full set of clothing, with underwear, briefs would be invisible under leggings, but you would just see the socks peeking out from top of the shoes for example. Its great fun!

Players have complete free reign to make anything they want, the description, the alias's, the alternative id names etc, and so far, from what I have seen there has been zero abuse of the mechanic, and a lot of care.

The way this process is protected and how players are made to be careful with it... this process is only avaialble to players who have medallions which can be won through IC means or by a small RL purchase (and soon I would assume by the tailor class for expensive IC currency).. i.e are either great players who will respect the game, or those who have paid for the privilidge and wont be wasting it.. so in a free to play game, you would make sure only players with commitment and who are vetted 'by-proxy' by their game playing time would be allowed to let loose or make sure that continued use of bad grammar / bad typos are classes as 'broken items' which are wasted. Or even use the players themselves as the vetters. Have long term players 'inspect' apprentices work(ii.e the spelling) and make it an in game mechanic that is fun!
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Old 09-27-2010, 11:51 PM   #10
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

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We are building up on a pretty conventional crafting system, a set of skills that turn PK arena trophies into a limited set of wearable items. The goal is both to increase the pool of raw materials and products, and to make sure that there's something unique about each product (therein lies the rub).
We have item properties, usually color and material, that are set by the materials it is crafted from.

An example might be that you get felt. You add green dye to it, and now you have green felt. You tailor the green felt into a jacket, and you've got a green felt jacket. You tailor the green felt jacket into a green felt admiral's coat.
There are other additions, such as being able to add buttons (gold toggle clasps vs crude wooden buttons, etc.), trimming, and so on. So you've got a fair number of customizable options.

We've found that players create uniforms ("Our mercenary company all wear black woolen caps, and red jackets") and do still value the unique.

Although anyone can craft an admiral's coat using the above process, the primary descriptions will still be based on the raw materials. That gives a nice amount of freedom to the players (anyone can have a green felt admiral's coat) while still allowing unique rewards. The unique reward would sometimes be a unique item (maybe I offer you a carefully sewn humanskin admiral's coat. Because I'm, y'know, disgusting and crazy) or it could be some unique raw materials (Kill a giant blue snake in the arena and I might offer you a roll of azure snakeskin, which you can then craft into whatever you want)

It also leads to more reuse of the unique items. I can give that roll of azure snakeskin to three different characters, and they'll probably use it for three different things. One might make a snakeskin hat and coat (how pimping!), while another might make a snakeskin cape and scabbard. While another might make hundreds of snakeskin buttons, and set themselves up as a button-merchant with the only supply of snakeskin buttons in the game. Five different "unique" items, even though staff only made one addition.

It also means we can add new item types without much worry. Someone wants us to add a housecoat? We can just do that. Now players can customize their housecoats based on the already-existing options. We don't need to make different unique housecoats for players A and B.

This has, of course, bitten us. Because it's so easy to add unique items, we regularly do. Now every player has a number of unique items, which in a lot of ways is really cool. But it also means unique items aren't nearly as valued as in some other games. Players won't scramble to win that one unique item on offer anymore.
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Old 10-19-2011, 09:04 PM   #11
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

In the game i play called Duris, the crafting system is based on random pieces of material types and a purchased craft skill. The piece drop randomly on npc corpses and there is a set amount of pieces of a certain material to make certain slots. For instance a badge would only require 1 piece of platinum while armor would require 3 pieces of platinum, etc. The stats on the created item are random standardized by a medium level of max stat or save (depending on whats standard for your mud). The outcome of the end eq made depends on the skill level of the character and luck stat. The names of the items are all randomized like a beatiful platinum badge or an elegant platinum cloak, etc. Works pretty well there.
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Old 10-19-2011, 11:39 PM   #12
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

For Ironclaw its depends on 'what' you are crafting.

For instance,if I wanted to make a simple chest, then it would be 'carve my 1st lumber ('1st' not 'First') into Chest...and I would have a chest.

If I wanted to make a huge chest, then its get a little complex because I must first carve the chest then carve it again to make it a huge chest.


In Second Life, almost anyone can build. Its knowing how to get the prims in the manner you want them in, and then taking the time to script animations (doors/lid opening are popular) or buy them at SLMarketplace.

Right now in SL Mesh building is gaining steam, but like Sculpturing (which I'm learning with Rokuro) done with the Blender 3D engine it wont surpass it or basic prim building. BUt there are steep learning curves to deal with.


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Old 10-20-2011, 12:56 PM   #13
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

We use a system where characters can customize items any way they want by applying different prefixes and trailers either taught at their guilds or which they design themselves. Player designs are submitted and screened by gamemasters through an automated process where designs are either accepted and added to a character's repertoire or rejected with a reason why.

A character who knows a lot of alters can create items with a nearly endless range of appearances, and with the ability to do custom designs, one of a kind items are also possible: a stately black steel dagger with an adamantine handle wrapped in scarlet cord.

The one thing I don't like about the way our stuff works is that itt doesn't require the actual materials that appear in item descriptions. I'm torn over the desire to keep things fun and flexible vs. keeping it immaculately realistic.
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Old 08-03-2012, 12:21 AM   #14
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

We're about to jump in the deep end on magical crafting on our mud (so far it's only been mundane items with custom descriptors), and it's looking like it will work off a template system. Eg/ you can create a magical longsword +5 with a frost special, which then picks up from a random set of frost specials and sticks them on the sword. Hoping it'll turn out well, though it's going to have to have a lot of groundwork first.

I *love* the idea on the below with the dying of fabric, no idea why it never occurred to me... in our game you buy "red wool" or "blue silk" from a vendor, and some characters have bemoaned the lack of the color they want... I think imma have to change this to base cloth and a bunch of dyes...
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Old 08-03-2012, 03:24 AM   #15
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

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I think imma have to change this to base cloth and a bunch of dyes...
Quite some time ago I set up a system where you can sheer sheep, pick silk cocoons from mulberry trees, and grow cotton and flax in fields. You then spin the fibres to thread and weave it to cloth. And then - wait for it! - you can dye the fabric into several different colours, by blending the three basic colours yellow, red and blue in different combinations.
Each time you dye a cloth the colour changes in a logical way, giving the fabric different properties, but also turning the colour darker. So after you dye the same fabric more than three times, the colour turns black and the magic goes poof.

The scripts for this system all work, and I also made the tools for it, like shearing sheers, spinning wheels and handlooms.

And yet it never got fully implemented.

Why?
Probably because I made the system so complex that I finally drowned in my own details. And somewhere on the road I got distracted and ran out of energy to finish it. So I ended up with a scripted crafting system that works to about 90 percent, but lacks the finish, where you create the actual end product, and balance the stats for it.

And now my coder says that it would be a lot easier to just code the entire system and randomize the effects...
Which probably means that it will never happen, since our coders usually just work with things that they think are fun, and crafting doesn't seem to be among those.

So feel free to "steal" the idea with the repeated dying, but don't fall into the same trap that I did, by making the system so complicated that you end up getting tired of your own creation before it is finished...
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Old 08-03-2012, 12:03 PM   #16
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

Crafting either needs to be fully scripted or fully coded--there's a ton of overhead getting code to communicate with scripts properly, sometimes--if I recall correctly, 4 dimensions is using dgscripts, which has a ton of little bugs (or so it did, last time I looked at it--it's been a while). Regardless, you end up with a lot of boilerplate code--almost identical bits of code everywhere--to allow your script to seemlessly call into the stuff your coder's doing. A system like you described above is much, much easier to code in the first place.

A big part of this is, yes, having an interested coder.

On one of my favorite muds, which I no longer play because the head/only coder (way over-protective of his sourcecode) basically abandoned it--everyone in the playerbase thinks he needs to release his codebase but he won't--you actually have full destructable environments. I've seen this before, but not to the degree that he did it--you can start anywhere on the worldmap, dig down, and you've got a mine. Each of the walls has a different deposit, and there's ways to see what's off in the distance (automagical see-through-the-wall, iirc--it's been a while). You can dig entire tunnel complexes, and everything, and can even dig down too far and fall out the bottom of the worldmap. The rest of it is rather standard crafting skills that raise through use,etc, except enchanting, wherein you find sort of enchanting tokens, and can charge them up and strip the bonuses to place on your items. The mining, to me, was the big selling point--the rest was very well done, but not overly original; the appeal was the "what comes next in the crafting tree" bit (You need to be able to make a good crafting tree for this to work). This was dark legacy btw, for the curious, and if he ever said he was going to be actively coding it again, I'd go back in a heartbeat--as it stands, there's a lot of unfinished bits all over.
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Old 08-03-2012, 07:00 PM   #17
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

I really like the idea of coconut-thread and weaving - sounds complex but with so many variables it ought to keep crafting fun! I am also curious if your skills had some sort of leveling system & how your mechanics addressed a neophyte crafter compared to a veteran one.

Crafting skills are almost non-existant in Arantha; so much other work has been done, but crafts have never been written. Currently I am working on gem appraisal/cutting, which is our first real 'craft' skills. Though I've some ideas written for a dynamic weapon smithing system, I'm at a loss with how to deal with fabric-crafting. I love the idea of taking raw goods & dyes and working them all together. I also think the multiple-layering of dyes to come up with a particular custom hue is also neat. Imagine some player who's found a method of specific dyes to create a cool color like a brambleberry-dyed cloak, and makes and sells custom-colored clothing to select clientele.

Magic-type items are rare in our campaign and expensive colored clothing is available for purchase. I'm trying to figure out some lures for players to craft in the first place, hopefully a bit beyond 'it's got pretty colors' and 'more resistance to damage' than ordinary clothes. I love playing dress-up as much as the next player, but endless crafting has never been my cup of tea. Also still trying to figure out how to factor in the skill level (our skills have about ten 'tiers' that are increased through exercise and I'm not sure if limiting the player by saying 'you can't mix that proper dye until your skill is level xxxxx'. Suggestions are most welcome!
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Old 08-08-2012, 03:01 PM   #18
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

Crafting on Threshold is a completely different set of guilds/classes.

The Tradesman guild includes Jewelers, Armor smiths, Weapon smiths, Clothiers, and Enchanters. The most important thing about it being a separate guild is it means you don't have a situation where every single craft gets dominated by all the bored high level players who learn crafting simply because they have nothing better to do.

All players in the game can gather resources. This creates two layers of economic interaction between crafters and adventurers (the gear/services sold to adventurers and the resources sold/given to crafters).

The gear that tradesmen make is some of the best stuff in the game so it is highly sought after.

Also, since nearly all gear resets every ~8 weeks, tradesmen have a lot of repeat business.
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Old 08-15-2012, 11:58 AM   #19
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

I'm gonna jump right in and crash the fantasy MU* party.

I GM on a cyberpunk MOO. The way "crafting" works is very different depending on what precisely you're trying to "craft."

As one might expect from a post-modern setting, crafting from scratch is pretty limited - after all, most things are available in shops.

There *is* clothing crafting, in which you buy material and use verbs on the material to set all the messages for a given piece of clothing - the best tailors are usually the best writers as well. There is a skill associated to finalizing a piece of clothing which determines the end coded value of a piece of clothing, based on the skill, the area covered and the type of material used.

Likewise, you also have tattooing, which uses a tattoo gun - again, the best tattoo artists are typically the best writers. Skill determines character count of the tattoo as well as how long it takes to apply.

You have surgery, which requires various tools. How is this "crafting" you may ask? Typically surgeons install cyberware and nanogenics in players - the surgeon could be said to be 'crafting' a cyborg.

Then you have the in-game internet, which works by virtue of the web I/O code in place. Hackers/programmers can build what we call grid nodes (web pages) for businesses and individuals, again based on their skills. Skilled hackers can take over grid nodes to spread their own message, for money or just out of enmity.

Gunsmiths can craft ammunition using a reloading bench and also modify firearms with modifications like barrel extensions, scopes, LAMs, suppressors and so on. They can also maintain and repair dirty/jammed firearms.

Chemists can craft different types of drugs using various types of lab equipment (and yeah, we do have a couple of Breaking Bad fans really making the most of it..) - labs need to be tended on a schedule to avoid ruining the current batch.

There's device modification - that is to say, soldering mod chips to and/or hacking devices for additional functionality.

There are also security systems - camera and sensor networks - that a security technician can put together and this stuff can be linked to cybernetics as well.

Then you have car and aerodyne mechanics, who can both repair vehicles and improve their performance with aftermarket parts.

And there's also explosives crafting from everyday objects - pipe bombs, incindiaries, and so on.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:21 PM   #20
camlorn
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Join Date: Aug 2011
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Re: Crafting: How does it work at your favorite game?

So, what MOO is this? That sounds fun, and I'm curious.

Threshold, I've been wanting to ask, and this seems as good a place as any: are there any logs of crafting on Threshold? I found a youtube video, but I'm blind so that doesn't help. I think you once said it was an alternative combat system of some sort, and I'd really like to see...
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