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Old 12-20-2010, 05:32 AM   #61
Zeta Thompson
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Re: What turns people from RP?

Back in the old days we used dice and sat around a table to play an RPG. Now set games on consoles are called RPGs. A few years ago being a 'gamer' became cool. So a generation of people who associate Console games that are stand alone with Role Playing Games came into the genre. They must interact with others, some find this a totally new concept. Some learn, most seem not to understand the difference between a hack and slash game you play by yourself and a MUD that is played with other people.

Ok Here is my problem with RPI muds lately.

Admin/Owner Controlled Issues

1. The environment is sloppy. There are typos all over the rooms, the rooms do not make sense in the general sense. zones, buildings etc, are too disconnected (One mud has a Fantasy area with a European Medeival style tavern surrounded by player built houses that range from "Meiji Restoration" style with that in the description to French Baroque mansions. Diverse environment and options for RP are good. In the same zone is bad.

2. You have a minimum pose length REQUIRED. Usually mushes have this, why do you have this on a MUD? I get tired of fluff fast.

3. It is an adult RPI MUD but the RP is less than the TS.

4. It is an adult RPI MUD that many of the players through their actions and OOC comments indicate they are not adults.

5. Whatever side the Admin is on always wins.

Player Issues

Most of all, it is the quality of the rp.
1. We spend an hour walking a block and nothing happens. THere is no character revelations, there is no action other than walks down the street looking at people and thinking. Maybe they hold someone's hand or look in a window. The rest of the pose is about what they see or are thinking.

2 Lately I have played MUDS and some MUSHES where every player tries to be the center of the scene all the time. There is little give and take. As the scene progresses it becomes apparent there is no overall plan or even attention paid to the others in the scene, just a bunch of "writers" showing off.

3. Back stories are blurted out and they are almost always the same. How about a thief that is not an orphan, forced into a life of crime by circumstances? I like my theives to come from a long line of them who are PROUD of their skill. (Yes I play thieves, smugglers, con artists etc. a lot)

4. Story arcs do not end. We are always at war with the Federation or Rebels. We never have any variation in the plot.

5. Players do not let established characters get hurt much less die.

6. I get asked rl personal questions all the time intermixed with the rp.

7. Players do not get that IC channels are IC. If a channel is called Wartalk I expect it to be IC not a discussion of someone's weekend or what the cat or baby is doing.

8. When I treat a charcter ICLY I get taken to task by other players for being mean or cold or smartass. Example : Player1: Where are you from? Me: The Underdark Player2:Hey what youw ant to be like that for? he was just being friendly.. Granted in an OOC channel like a newbie channel that response is uncalled for, then again so is that question.

9. I am asked who my alts are or encouraged to reveal them. If you cannot tell from my play style I take that as a compliment. But honestly why do they even care?

10. Last but probably not least is the tendancy of some players to feel they have to or CAN 'win" the game over all.
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Old 12-20-2010, 08:37 AM   #62
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Re: What turns people from RP?

Zeta I don't know what games you're trying, but they don't sound like RPIs. You say that these are your issues with RPIs. I don't know of any that has a *minimum* emote length, or that even calls them poses. They -do- however have *maximum* lengths.

I don't know of any that have actual chat channels - one has an ooc command that is heard/used by people in the same game room as each other - it's not global or zone-specific. Another one has an OOC lounge, which is -explicitly- OOC and when you enter that area, you cease to be your character and your sdec is something like, "the male humanoid" or something like that.

In an RPI, you can't expect to have to "do" something with every single movement. The rooms can easily be 20 minutes away from each other if you're moving from point A to point B, including movement delays. If you had to act out a scene in every room, your journey could easily take 5 or 6 RL hours. And that's just getting from point A to point B, and not actually doing what it is you came to do once you get to your destination.

It sounds more to me like you're describing a MUSH or MUCK.
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Old 12-20-2010, 08:49 AM   #63
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Re: What turns people from RP?

From what Zeta describes, outside of the difference in Building Period styles, is the very Game I used to enjoy playing but now bash repeatedly in these Fourms.

Everything she describes, fits that MUD to a 'T'

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Old 12-20-2010, 10:55 PM   #64
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Re: What turns people from RP?

I gotta tell you Zeta most of those things turn me off as well on games that claim to be Roleplay. But remember RPG means any game that you aren't playing yourself whether it is ooc or not.

Most of your list items are not allowed in NWA. One of my personal pet peeves on any roleplaying game is self spotlighting. I really encourage players to roleplay for others in the game. In other words, focus on other peoples roleplay and you will only enlighten and develop your own.

I welcome you to try NWA and perhaps see some of this and hopefully less of that.
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Old 01-02-2011, 01:06 PM   #65
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Smile Re: What turns people from RP?

well first of all it depends what type of rp it is, you know some mud games force players to rp as a lover, walk with your gf at a park and rp,
i myself like to rp as a fighter, i've played a game called tgg "the gratest generation" and i really enjoyed, because i had rps like pull the trigger, hold the breath and aim, "i was a sniper there" beside the good combat system.
Really is there any game like that? I want to rp like that one, not borring things.

And my problem is that english is my secondery language. And i cannot write long poses, also my writing quality is low, so admins get mad of me, and i cannot find some one to rp.
Thats why i love "moo" system!
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Old 01-05-2011, 12:10 AM   #66
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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Originally Posted by Sombalance View Post
Do the H&S guys argue over silly crap too?
Yep. All the time. Pkers too, difference is they tend to be less eloquent in their discussions. Sword to face tends to inhibit negotiation skills.
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Old 01-05-2011, 12:15 AM   #67
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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Originally Posted by Jazuela View Post
Zeta I don't know what games you're trying, but they don't sound like RPIs.
snip snip snip

These are examples from many MUDS over many years. I do know the difference between a MUD and a MUSH (though am still fuzzy on MUCK other than codebase). True some are not RPIs per definition in this thread but they were advertised as such therefore I walked into them expecting certain things.
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Old 01-05-2011, 02:30 PM   #68
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Re: What turns people from RP?

Well using that logic Zeta, I had a bowl of frosted mini-wheats this morning. On the back of the box, were a few paragraphs extolling the virtues of shredded wheat cereals. Within that text, were the letters R, P, and I. I am horribly disappointed to discover that my bowl of cereal was not an RPI. I mean, I ate the whole bowl, expecting some RPI goodness and got NONE. What a ripoff. Therefore, frosted mini-wheats are lousy.

This thread is about Topic A. You are complaining about Topic B. So really, your post is off topic.
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Old 01-06-2011, 01:04 AM   #69
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Re: What turns people from RP?

Zeta,

I understood exactly what you meant by your posts and I think they were valid enough to be on this thread as the thread is what turns people from Roleplay and you defined what did it for you. So good on ya.
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Old 01-06-2011, 02:16 PM   #70
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Re: What turns people from RP?

To me, sitting around a virtual table belching flowery emotes is not role-play. What turns me off is people insisting that it is.

I enjoy games where the decisions you make and the actions you take define your character, not your ability to describe each breath you draw in flowing prose.
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Old 01-06-2011, 08:06 PM   #71
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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To me, sitting around a virtual table belching flowery emotes is not role-play. What turns me off is people insisting that it is.

I enjoy games where the decisions you make and the actions you take define your character, not your ability to describe each breath you draw in flowing prose.
Not to pick on you, since you happen to be the last person to post... but isn't this an example of "both sides" (if there even are "sides") missing the point of what the other RPers are doing?

I certainly agree that I enjoy games where the decisions you make and actions you take define your character.

But, while I enjoy many sorts of computer games, for me a *role playing* game has to involve the *character* making decisions that *I* as the player would not make. The character has to be more than just an extension of me interacting with the world.

I'll enjoy Half-Life, or WoW. But in both those cases I use my avatar to interact in the world in the way that I think will best achieves my goals. And my goals are not to "define a character" - they are to "kill that monster" or "get that armor." - despite the label as those games being RPGs (or, at least WoW being one) I don't consider that roleplaying. I consider it game playing.

So, if we accept my rambling above as valid, and assume that part of "defining your character" involves the character making decisions and actions based on their personality, which will sometimes/often be different to the decisions the player knows is best... we can then examine the two extremes you mention.

An extreme hack & slash game, where I walk into the room, drink healing potions, and attack the monsters - is that roleplaying? Well, I'd say it's not, if it's the player making what they see as the best decisions for the character. Drink the potion before you die. Use the best equipment. And if the game actively punishes players that don't behave that way, I'd say the game is discouraging roleplaying (at least in that specific aspect, during the combat)

A simple question. Imagine you're playing a Barbarian. In that game, would it be likely that your barbarian dresses in loose leather clothing, comfortable and familiar from their homeland? Or that they wear plate mail armor because it's more protective? Why? Is it because the mechanics don't allow barbarians to wear heavy armor, and/or gives bonuses for a lightly armored barbarian? Or is it because that's how you think your barbarian would behave? If you run into a priest, would the priest be wearing or carrying their holy symbol with them even if it gives no mechanical benefit? Because they truly believe in their god?

It's those sorts of decisions, I believe, that separate someone who's "playing the game" from someone who's "playing a role" - obviously, there will always be an overlap between playing the game vs playing a role. We all do a little of both, and all have a preference for which we prefer to focus on.

So I truly do believe that even in a H&S game, there is opportunity for roleplaying. At least, as much as the game allows. (If there is no "holy symbol" item, my priest obviously can't carry one... and if there is a limited emoting system, I can't easily define the aspects of my priest's personality for others. But hey, that brings us to the other extreme...)

Will mentions that sitting around a table belching flowery emotes is not roleplaying. I will agree, although that description look like it's intended to be intentionally insulting to players who prefer a more descriptive roleplaying.

But yes, if someone does a three-line emote to show them entering a room, that's not necessarily roleplaying. Again, I'd go back to my question about whether the character is just an extension of the player. Are the emotes just showing how "cool" they are (either by showing how they skulk in, as a moody, hardcore bad guy. Or how they flow in, birds singing, gliding around the room like a Disney princess) - yuck! Seen both done to death.
And do those description then match how they play the character? Does the hardcore bad guy then talk about how many people he's murdered, but then leap to the rescue of another PC in distress to get the chance to be the hero? Are the players looking at the actions of the *other* players around them, and using those experiences to have their characters grow and change in believable ways?

If not, well (here's my chance to be insulting) - then long descriptions of what your character is doing isn't roleplay. It's basically writing a masturbatory fan-fiction set in this game world.

So what would I consider roleplaying in this instance? Being consistent, allowing the character to pay attention and react to the world around them, and then to grow and change based on those experiences. And I'd consider it appropriate to give as much description as necessary to convey those features. Whether that takes five lines, or three words.

So our Disney princess might come into the room, and not need three lines of emotes. It might be enough to enter the room and "smile brightly at everyone". Similarly, the bad guy might "walk in, with his shoulder hunched. He petulantly glares at the people, before sullenly wishing them a good morning." - Sure, that's longer than necessary just to walk into a room, but it gives the other players useful information they can react to. They can see he's being moody, but that he's not actively picking a fight. It also shows that the character and player aren't "the same person" (Who describes themselves as petulant?)
Now, I'd expect things to go further than this. If something bad happened to the Disney princess in the game, I'd expect her to display that through the roleplaying. Maybe she's petulant, or upset, instead of brightly cheerful.

- Similarly, if another player (not knowing if anything happened) notices that the princess is sullen rather than happy - and knows she's normally happy - they should be able to find out *what* happened. Or at least try to find out. And there SHOULD be a reason, something that happened as part of the game. If the reason is "the player is annoyed today" then - again - that's just playing a game. Not playing a role.

So long ramble aside... summary is:
- If the character is responding to what the player wants and knows, rather than responding to the in-game situation as they view it, you're playing a game, not playing a role.
- Defining a character can be done in many ways. What they wear, what they carry, how they speak, what actions they choose to take. As long as those actions lead towards building a story rather than "winning the game" or "getting everyone to pay attention to me" then it's valid roleplaying. Neither H&S games, not flowery emote games have a more valid claim than the other. Both have roleplayers, and both have non-roleplayers.
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Old 01-08-2011, 07:17 AM   #72
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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Originally Posted by Zeta Thompson View Post
Ok Here is my problem with RPI muds lately.
As has already been pointed out, some of the problems you're describing indicate that you're not actually talking about RPI MUDs. This is an excellent example of why misuse of the term RPI is detrimental to the RPI community. Here we have someone with legitimate complaints about MUDs who is singling out RPIs when in fact they are not actually talking about RPIs MUDs. Because some games out there are calling themselves RPI, their poor quality is being cited in association with a type of game of which they are not.

As for the problems mentioned in the original post, I share the frustration. Some, though obviously not all, are problems that I find increasingly common in many MUDs, RPIs included. It's a symptom of the parity of mediocrity in the community brought about by several causes not the least of which is the obsession with playerbase size and the lowering of standards to attract more players (at least so far as the RPIs are concerned; some formerly RP-light games have actually made improvements in their RP but as I said it's creating a parity of mediocrity).

The things that Zeta Thompson mentioned are many of the reasons I've stopped playing MUDs for entertainment. With me, I played RPIs exclusively since 2002 and they're just not what they used to be nor is the outlook all that promising. In fact, just last night I was thinking about the old days and remembering when I used to spend many a night fixed before my computer RPing. Now, the only reason I really play MUDs is for evaluation and review.

Jason
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Old 01-08-2011, 03:05 PM   #73
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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Originally Posted by prof1515 View Post
As for the problems mentioned in the original post, I share the frustration. Some, though obviously not all, are problems that I find increasingly common in many MUDs, RPIs included. It's a symptom of the parity of mediocrity in the community brought about by several causes not the least of which is the obsession with playerbase size and the lowering of standards to attract more players (at least so far as the RPIs are concerned; some formerly RP-light games have actually made improvements in their RP but as I said it's creating a parity of mediocrity).
Jason


Amen...

I don't need to explain the 'Game' this is happening to, as I have ralled against it here enought times to make your eyes roll back in your heads. But, I see now this isn't just happening with 'that' Game. Many. many others are afflicted in simular manner, and often because of the same reasons.

And the things they're doing to try attracting players to stay, aren't really oppertunities for character growth through involvement. They're just 'Candy', sweet at first but eventually boring in the end.

Games need 'substance', that available support Players seek and can rely upon to keep them hooked and motivated to contribute to the Games overall health and continued exsistance. Candy doesn't cut it. There has to be the allowance for growth and possibilities all around, for all players not just the few favored.

This is what's wanted.


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Old 01-10-2011, 11:32 AM   #74
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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Not to pick on you, since you happen to be the last person to post... but isn't this an example of "both sides" (if there even are "sides") missing the point of what the other RPers are doing?

I certainly agree that I enjoy games where the decisions you make and actions you take define your character.

..snip..
I don't think I said what I meant, at least not very well. Let me try again.

There is certainly a place in role-play for extended description to suggest mood, intention, or anything else that can be implied. After all, an enormous part of communication comes from body language, voice intonation and uncountable other physical nuances that can only be captured in emotes. That's just a natural part of the act of playing a role in a world where the only tools available are typed words.

What I object to is the attitude that every single muscle twitch must be described for role-play to take place, and I really resent being ridiculed for failing to do it that way. It's happened to me on multiple occasions, more than once when I've just stepped into a game for the first time.

The issue is a little bit more complex than that, though. I banged out my original post in a rush and chose my words poorly. My intention was not to insult. Bottom line, these games should be about having fun, and if sitting in a tavern chatting with great description is fun for you (rhetorical), then have at it. It's entirely possible to establish a character history this way. I just don't consider it great RP.

To me, what makes great role-play is hard decisions. Characters can discuss the value of preempting a rumored imminent attack by the evil enemy from the east, but until they choose a course and take action, there are no consequences and no one is meaningfully affected. Trial. Decision. Consequence. This is the process that defines character, IMHO, and while the art of prose emotion and all manner of communication is necessary along the way, no amount of fireside storytelling can replace characters choosing a course of action and seeing it through.

Quote:
..snip..

But, while I enjoy many sorts of computer games, for me a *role playing* game has to involve the *character* making decisions that *I* as the player would not make. The character has to be more than just an extension of me interacting with the world.

..snip..
I guess I don't define "role-playing game" quite as strictly. In my mind, it's more about atmosphere and opportunity than differentiating my character from myself. The key is immersion, and if a game world includes an environment rich with context within which I can assimilate my character and offers a narrative to which he/she/it can react, I can apply my own tastes, desires, opinions and morals, and still find the fulfillment of being someone else in another world.
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Old 01-10-2011, 05:11 PM   #75
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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I don't think I said what I meant, at least not very well. Let me try again.

There is certainly a place in role-play for extended description to suggest mood, intention, or anything else that can be implied. After all, an enormous part of communication comes from body language, voice intonation and uncountable other physical nuances that can only be captured in emotes. That's just a natural part of the act of playing a role in a world where the only tools available are typed words.

What I object to is the attitude that every single muscle twitch must be described for role-play to take place, and I really resent being ridiculed for failing to do it that way. It's happened to me on multiple occasions, more than once when I've just stepped into a game for the first time.
I agree with this 100%

Just like writing a novel, you should be as descriptive as necessary to convey a good story, but brief enough to keep it moving. (A reason why I could never be a novel writer...)

And nobody should feel ridiculed for joining a game. Even if your style doesn't match the preferred style of the game, there are polite ways of saying "We do things differently here" - ridicule is never the appropriate response. Unfortunately, I've seen it happen in a number of games, too.

And, yes, usually by the people who love the "look at me" extended unnecessary emotes. Or by the mechanically-minded players who consider knowledge of the game-world to be roleplaying, and ridicule new arrivals who can't possibly know the game world yet. Either way, it seems to be the extremes that tend to that behavior.

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My intention was not to insult. Bottom line, these games should be about having fun, and if sitting in a tavern chatting with great description is fun for you (rhetorical), then have at it. It's entirely possible to establish a character history this way. I just don't consider it great RP.
Oh yes. The games are about having fun.

But I think "you're having fun" and "you're roleplaying" are two different things. I could easily be doing one and not the other.

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To me, what makes great role-play is hard decisions. Characters can discuss the value of preempting a rumored imminent attack by the evil enemy from the east, but until they choose a course and take action, there are no consequences and no one is meaningfully affected. Trial. Decision. Consequence. This is the process that defines character, IMHO,
I agree. All this creates (positive) drama, which is necessary for interesting storytelling.
There needs to be an obstacle to be overcome. Battle strategies for an imminent attack is certainly a clear obstacle, with clear options for overcoming it.

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and while the art of prose emotion and all manner of communication is necessary along the way, no amount of fireside storytelling can replace characters choosing a course of action and seeing it through.
I'd argue with this. It depends what the players do with the situation. A discussion of the imminent attack could be responded to by "fireside storytelling" reactions, and a decision to just wait and fight the enemy when they arrive. The players might not weigh up the options or make hard decisions.
Similarly, the fireside storytelling might involve a tale about an outlawed religion, secretly sharing your alliegances with the witnesses while giving an excuse to plead innocence if the church comes to burn you at the stake. - that's a tough decision to make, too. And choosing the words of the story might be very important.
(But I'm biased. Since my game is political, the above situation can, and has, happened. And it's totally awesome when done properly.)

Usually you're right, fireside storytelling is pretty meaningless. But even then, it often gives information about the game world, which can be useful later. A story about the dangerous swamps to the east? Maybe you should flee there from the enemies attack - the dangerous terrain might help even the odds. Or they might be unwilling to chase you into there.

So for me, a lot of the fun of a game with "fireside storytelling" is that there is useful, tactical information there. It's just hidden amongst the discussions, and I have to filter what my character is told, and decide what is important and what isn't. For me, that's the clues that show me what the obstacles are, and how to overcome them.

But yeah, if there is nothing but stories, and they won't reveal useful information (about the other characters, or the game world) - then I'm not interested in it. As you say, it's roleplay. But not necessarily good roleplay.

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I guess I don't define "role-playing game" quite as strictly. In my mind, it's more about atmosphere and opportunity than differentiating my character from myself. The key is immersion, and if a game world includes an environment rich with context within which I can assimilate my character and offers a narrative to which he/she/it can react, I can apply my own tastes, desires, opinions and morals, and still find the fulfillment of being someone else in another world.
Sure. And that's the attitude of most players (on my game as well)
I'm probably just a snobby roleplay elitist, since I came to roleplay through tabletop from a group of friends into dramatics, rather than through computer games.

But, for me, immersion is damaged by players that use their own opinions and morals. *some* players can do that, which is fine, but if all do it, it's a problem. An example, again from my game - we have a different society, with nobles, commoners, slaves - all that. Players that push for modern morals hurt the immersion of the world - when you see a noble, you expect certain things. You expect them to act like a noble. You expect the commoners to show deference to them (at least to an extent. There can still be rebellions, and all that), you expect slaves to be treated as a lower-class citizen. When players have their characters talk about how "respect should be earned" and "everyone is equal" then - that's a fine decision. But considering the game world, they should either expect the authorities to come down on their head, or they should expect everyone to tell them that they're talking crazy. If *everyone* joins in with that attitude... well, what's the point of even having nobles and slaves in the game at all?

I would never say that your character shouldn't have that modern attitude. I'd never tell you how to run your character. But I *would* say that if your character behaved like that, they should see some sort of in-game response to their behavior. Something that, hopefully, creates more roleplaying and story.

I wonder if that means I'm one of the people "forcing" roleplay. But, for me, a game isn't meaningful unless the actions of my character are meaningful. And that means the game has to give a reaction to the actions my (and other) characters take.

So, I guess, that's what I mean about "playing someone else" - In real life, I firmly believe that all people are equal. But if I'm playing in a setting with nobles and slaves, I would either play my character as someone who accepts that some people are "better than others", or I'd play a character that keeps his opinions to himself, or I'd play a character that speaks out against the injustice (and expects something to happen because of speaking out)
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Old 01-10-2011, 11:41 PM   #76
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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...I think "you're having fun" and "you're roleplaying" are two different things. I could easily be doing one and not the other.
Without a doubt, which was kind of my point. Sitting around writing in-game prose might be fun, but I don't consider it to be the height of RP, as many people do.

Quote:
It depends what the players do with the situation. A discussion of the imminent attack could be responded to by "fireside storytelling" reactions, and a decision to just wait and fight the enemy when they arrive. The players might not weigh up the options or make hard decisions.
Well, there are no absolutes. As with emoting, storytelling has a place in a role-playing game. Discussing events and deciding what to do about them is a natural part of the progression. And it's true--not every situation will call for a lynch mob. I would argue, however, that deciding not to preempt a possibly imminent attack could be as difficult as storming immediately into battle. Waiting could have far worse consequences than taking the fight to the bad guys.

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Similarly, the fireside storytelling might involve a tale about an outlawed religion, secretly sharing your alliegances with the witnesses while giving an excuse to plead innocence if the church comes to burn you at the stake.
I hope I didn't give the idea that "action" has to necessarily mean "combat." I have actually always tried to avoid battle as plot and/or resolution as I've designed storylines. Intrigue is a heck of a lot more fun than constant hack and slash. I just believe there are better ways to deliver information than sitting around talking about it. Show instead of telling, please.

From the players' side, I'd rather unleash a covert plot to free condemned religious outlaws with whom I secretly sympathize than to sit at a bar and tell a story about them. It all depends on the powers that be presenting such opportunities and reacting to player initiative, of course, but ideally, that's how it should work. That, in my opinion, is real role-play.
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Old 01-11-2011, 02:17 PM   #77
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Re: What turns people from RP?

Here's another perspective:

I've mudded on and off for 15 years now and I've never been interested in RPI. One would think that, as a writer, I'd be naturally attracted to the idea. But what prevents me from even trying it out is that the few RP logs I've read don't seem like great fun to me. I see a lot of dancing around the obvious artificiality of the medium, various degrees of show-offishness, and an overall verbosity, all of which I associate with a boring graduate seminar more than with a game.

I'm sure there are moments and places in time where RPI can be fun to even the likes of me, but honestly I'm quite happy with action-focused, RP-light to no-RP mudding, which doesn't beat around the bush. Can an RPI world be action-focused as well? Probably, but I suspect you'd have to be very lucky to find the right kind of people for your kind of mindset, and the kind of world that makes it all come together. It seems that the chances for that are about as high as finding true love.
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Old 01-11-2011, 06:17 PM   #78
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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Originally Posted by plamzi View Post
Here's another perspective:

I've mudded on and off for 15 years now and I've never been interested in RPI. One would think that, as a writer, I'd be naturally attracted to the idea. But what prevents me from even trying it out is that the few RP logs I've read don't seem like great fun to me. I see a lot of dancing around the obvious artificiality of the medium, various degrees of show-offishness, and an overall verbosity, all of which I associate with a boring graduate seminar more than with a game.

I'm sure there are moments and places in time where RPI can be fun to even the likes of me, but honestly I'm quite happy with action-focused, RP-light to no-RP mudding, which doesn't beat around the bush. Can an RPI world be action-focused as well? Probably, but I suspect you'd have to be very lucky to find the right kind of people for your kind of mindset, and the kind of world that makes it all come together. It seems that the chances for that are about as high as finding true love.
I'd argue that it's actually easier to find "action-focused" RPIs now than it is to find traditional RPI role-play. That's one of those reasons I illustrated earlier for why many veterans left RPIs.
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Old 01-11-2011, 07:54 PM   #79
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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Originally Posted by plamzi View Post
Can an RPI world be action-focused as well? Probably, but I suspect you'd have to be very lucky to find the right kind of people for your kind of mindset, and the kind of world that makes it all come together. It seems that the chances for that are about as high as finding true love.
The answer is yes if you are talking about Intense Roleplay world and not the Trademark engine which i've found is more about posing and simple features (eg permadeath or no guilds) than adventure.

If you are looking for traditional adventuring with large groups, exciting and intense roleplay, without the hassle of kids talk about whaddup and their homework, fishing, sailing, caravans, and invasions all in a epic story driven world then New Worlds Ateraan is you destination. Yes, many have come together to this world and found the niche they haven't found elsewhere.
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Old 01-12-2011, 08:33 AM   #80
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Re: What turns people from RP?

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Originally Posted by plamzi View Post
Here's another perspective:
I'm sure there are moments and places in time where RPI can be fun to even the likes of me, but honestly I'm quite happy with action-focused, RP-light to no-RP mudding, which doesn't beat around the bush. Can an RPI world be action-focused as well? Probably, but I suspect you'd have to be very lucky to find the right kind of people for your kind of mindset, and the kind of world that makes it all come together. It seems that the chances for that are about as high as finding true love.
Action and RP don't have to be mutually exclusive. If a game has mechanics that offer fast and furious combat as well as a carefully crafted narrative, you can easily have both. My theory is that the healthy way of promoting any behavior in a game is to make it fun. Instead of implementing rules that force people to role-play, make role-playing fun. I've seen it done, and done well in a game where intrigue and assassination went hand in hand. This is why I'm so adamant about role-play being an active, participatory activity instead of a table-side chat.
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