Top Mud Sites Forum Return to TopMudSites.com
Go Back   Top Mud Sites Forum > MUD Players and General Discussion > Roleplaying and Storytelling
Click here to Register

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-05-2003, 11:27 AM   #1
OnyxFlame
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 153
OnyxFlame is on a distinguished road
Post

Most of my chars have something in common with me, mainly because there's certain types of chars I avoid playing because they're boring. It's not that I can't play something completely opposite to my personality, it's just that I don't find most of those possibilities interesting.

I've played manipulative bitches. I've played helpful but paranoid mages. I've played lazy storytelling fighters. But I just can NOT play a char who isn't very social, because it bores the crap outta me to just sit in a room alone, even if that's what my char would do. For this reason I don't tend to play evil thieves and assassins either.

It's also hard for me to have a char without a twisted sense of humor. I just adore teasing people and cracking the occasional dirty joke.

And because I'm so social and like to joke around so much, I tend not to play the bad guy type chars because they wouldn't be believable anyway. Sometimes my chars end up intimidating because they're powerful and have powerful friends, but not because they're mysterious or sadistic or anything. In fact it could be argued that threats are more effective when rarely used.

But generally I play the nice, helpful, overworked mage who tries to honor all her commitments and see justice done, no matter how much she bitches about random events along the way.

How about you guys?
OnyxFlame is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2003, 11:55 AM   #2
Crystal
Member
 
Crystal's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Name: Crystal
Location: Maryland
Home MUD: Advent of the Mists
Posts: 126
Crystal is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to Crystal
I think all of my characters have some sort of piece of myself in them. I like it that way because I can roleplay their ideals and all that pretty passionately and make it seem believable.

I personally have a hard time playing evil characters. I just feel bad when I'm mean So I tend not to play them so much. Then again I don't play hardcore lightwalkers either because I'd want to shoot myself if I was too righteous. But it's nice to challenge your roleplaying abilities once in a while. So I might create the occasional 'side' character. But my main characters are always concepts I know I can do well.
Crystal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2003, 04:03 PM   #3
Brianna
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Bel Air, MD USA
Posts: 81
Brianna is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to Brianna Send a message via MSN to Brianna Send a message via Yahoo to Brianna
Arrow

I have fun playing various types of characters. On one game I played (it died several years ago) I played a dwarven druid (good aligned) so believable that when that mud died and I chose to play an evil character my old nemesis couldn't picture me playing an evil character.

I have fun exploring various races and classes and pushing my limits. I have played loner characters who finally find a friend/love.

My main style is having a character that does interact in some way and develop them from there.
Brianna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2003, 06:14 PM   #4
Dulan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 354
Dulan is on a distinguished road
Send a message via ICQ to Dulan
Eh.

I personally find RP with defined "good" and "evil" - or even a near global accepted perception of "good" and "evil" - extremely low-class, low-level RP. Logging in to a RP MUD and hearing those words is normally sufficient for me to leave and never bother coming again.

I also find cliched characters extremely irritating, for that matter.

My favorite character to date, however, has to be a senile old man that I once RP'd. He had a bit of an ability as a mage, and could haggle like no one else..but...he mistook tents for sheets strung up on lines in the middle of a town square. And the list goes on. That has to be one of my favorite characters to RP - a character that really has no bloody idea of what is going on, never will, and is really completely hopeless . The amount of fun to play those type of characters is endless, but it is extremely hard to find a MU* in which they can be played.

-D
Dulan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2003, 08:56 PM   #5
Maia
New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 13
Maia is on a distinguished road
Question

I feel the same way, Dulan.

For starters, I believe the whole "good vs evil" duality to be hokum. †Does anyone IRL actually consider themselves to be evil? †Very, very few would, I suspect. †I think we tend to label as "evil" those whose attitudes and actions differ markedly from our own. †As humans, we all perform actions we are proud of and those we are not so proud of.

In the words of Edward Falconer, †"it is not so much the actions of characters that are important, but the motivations behind them".

And there lies the real reason why I avoid the "good" and "evil" stereotypes. †I just don't find acting good for the sake of being good (or evil for the sake of being evil) all that interesting. †Creating a character's history, value set and personality which enable me to determine how he or she would react to a particular circumstance, to explore his or her motivations - there for me lies the beauty and interest of role playing.


I tend to play characters that are essentially me, since this lays down a solid foundation for believable roleplay. †But, because of their backgrounds or environments or just a few personality quirks I introduced out of curiousity, they differ enough from me to enable me to feel like I'm exploring someone else's brain. †Because if I'm just going to be me, I might as well stay in the real world, right?

It's similar to my preference in gameworlds. †I most enjoy worlds that are very realistic, that is, in most regards they work just like RL. †For me, this makes the experience much more believable and immersive, so I feel I can more deeply experience those aspects of the world that do differ from Earth.


Maia
Maia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2003, 12:07 PM   #6
OnyxFlame
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 153
OnyxFlame is on a distinguished road
Post

Well I didn't mean good and evil as in literal alignments and stuff, since DM is really cool not to have those heh. But play long enough and you'll notice people that most consider good and people that most consider evil, as well as the occasional confusion between the person's friends who think they're good and their enemies or random people who think they're evil.

But yeah I don't like to play goody goody 2 shoes types any more than I like to play the steal-your-mother's-dentures types. I like to be mostly helpful but sometimes bitchy and disgruntled or manipulative. My chars come up with "evil" plots now and then to advance towards their goals and so on. And I've had chars who try to do good and noble things and are criticized for it.
OnyxFlame is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2003, 02:51 PM   #7
shadowfyr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 310
shadowfyr will become famous soon enough
Well. With respect to the good and evil thing... The two terms are far to broad to be accurate. They are used in the real world to refer to actions as they relate to normal behaviour, not the real nature of the individual. If you want to use them as actually attributes, then you need to define good = philanthropist and evil = sociopath. In other words a good person does beneficial things to people because it gives them an emotional benefit to know that they helped. Sociopaths by definition can only experience emotional benefit if the end result benefits themselves, any side benefit that may come to others is secondary.

This is also why you get the 'he just snapped' syndrome with some (most?) seriel killers. They generally play by the rules defined for the society around them right up to the point where their own desires and benefits out weight or over power the need to follow those rules. In other words if you like to kill things, the emotional boost from that will eventually over power the need you feel to conform.

An 'evil' character thus should be a ticking bomb that may appear no different than anyone else, though perhaps more selfish, but at some point there desire for power, wealth or just to start killing anyone that takes their fancy will become more important to them than the need to socially interact with others. That is assuming you choose to use a narrower and more accurate definition for 'evil'.

Note that this leaves open the possibility of a similar social disorder in which a person could be too good and litterally ignore all of their own needs because they have no true sense of themselves beyond others that they have helped. Which only goes to prove that people one both ends of the spectrum are totally nuts.
shadowfyr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2003, 04:46 AM   #8
GoatLady
New Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: England
Posts: 7
GoatLady is on a distinguished road
Angry

It seems many of you like to try out different things, maybe on the same game or as you switch from place to place, but I find that really difficult.

To go from being a schizophrenic assassin to a warm and friendly priest would be totally impossible for me to do. This is why I tend to use one game and one character at a time. Then as I move on, I modify my character slightly, to suit their new home.
† Playing this way, I find that I don't have the confusion of:
"Did he attack this character or one of my other ones?"
or
"Does this character know that person or have I only met them on another?"

I suppose I feel safer playing a character that I'm already in tune with, but I do put my heart and soul into her.
I tend to play a "nice" character (Staying away from the word "good" since she wouldn't put herself in danger to help another, which is how I see a "good" character) although she is cold and unhelpful to other females out of jealousy. I can recall one time when a girl asked me for directions to a city and I took her to a tomb where she was almost destroyed by a group of bats. Was this an evil thing to do? Possibly, but ask any male around and they'll tell you how sweet and innocent she is!

I find it unrealistic to play a beautiful character because one persons idea of beauty may not be anothers so I let them decide this. Although I don't think I share the same view on this with a vast number of people since I see all too often a "beautiful female with a shapely body".
Well girls, don't we all want to be her...?! We all know the pretty ones are the man-eaters anyway †
GoatLady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2003, 10:35 AM   #9
Tindalos
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Sweden
Posts: 10
Tindalos is on a distinguished road
Send a message via ICQ to Tindalos
Exclamation

Personally, I have no problem playing any type though I still have something of myself in every character I create. I've played the evil and misunderstood magic user, the lonesome ranger in the lush forest, the sweaty blacksmith, graceful noblewoman and so on...
My longest living character has been alive for more than two years and I happily admit that both the character and myself have evolved since he was created. I've learned a lot about roleplaying, scheming, backstabbing (literal), diplomacy as well as I've put parts of myself into the making of my favorite character ever.
Tindalos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2003, 12:28 PM   #10
Alaire
Member
 
Alaire's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Name: Lisa
Location: www.elwar.com/southlands
Home MUD: The Southlands
Posts: 69
Alaire is on a distinguished road
Send a message via ICQ to Alaire Send a message via AIM to Alaire
Firstly, I must say Tindalos, you play a wonderful shifty bastard pc.

I never really had a problem playing different types of pc's, and admit that all of mine have a piece of me in them. †I've played evil demons and angelic priestesses. †I do have to agree with Dulan though, that while I consider my demons 'evil', they are far from black-and-white evil, and always have something about them that is either righteous or likeable-even to a small group of people. †They're never straight-up EVIL with no depth behind that label. †I have been working on my style of emoting lately, watching carefully how I phrase my sentences in text. †I find that gives away more than anything who is playing who and seems to be my only 'style'.

I think the secret to good roleplay in general is being able to see the value in the shades of grey in everything. †Bad guys aren't all that interesting if they're just 'bad'. †The story behind that wickedness... the essence of the person behind the 'mastermind' label.... that's what makes roleplay good and rewarding. †

I played once with a serial-killer pc that was killing women and taking parts of their bodies in order to create himself the perfect bride. †While the premise is certainly creepy, what made it truly great were the breaks from the thrill of the chase, where he was alone with a victim and let some grief from his past show... or when he was talking to himself where he thought no one could hear... or when he finally had everything, but his magic failed him... †every bit of character development beyond the 'evil' he did, was engrossing to watch and scary to be a part of!!
Alaire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2003, 09:12 PM   #11
Falconer
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Paris
Posts: 35
Falconer is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to Falconer
Believe it or not, this is actually a question that comes to light every couple of months or so on these forums or the forums at The Mud Connector. Saying that threads such as these, where players define the character "types" that they enjoy playing is not only a pet peve of mine, but a mindset that I think is adopted far too often. It's also one that, all things considered, has a truly negative impact on any intensive roleplaying environment.

The neccessity for a player to define a character "type/style" is one that's been handed down from Gygax and his team at TSR who created the original and advanced Dungeons and Dragons systems. The noble warrior, the furtive thief, the stoic mage--archetypes that appear in novels from Tolkien to Jordan, in video games and table top settings.

In table top settings, the class system is actually somewhat appropriate. It allows a group of players to specialize into various areas and go off on amazing adventures. The plot of a tabletop RPG is focused upon this journey, this adventure and the physical and emotional impact it has on the characters who travel it.

Online environments are completely different. With the majority of roleplaying MU*s that I've experienced, a developing storyline is only a part (sometimes major - as with Wes Platt's worlds - and sometimes very minor, as with the RPI Xyllomer.) The rest is the task of both administrators and players to create a living, breathing world. In a table top, fantasy RPG it would be ridiculous to chronicle the life of a blacksmith who sits all day by the forge and tinkers. In an online, fantasy world this is entirely appropriate.

That said, as a roleplaying administrator and creative director, I strongly urge my players (and for that matter, all players) to stray from this notion of creating a character type. The good vs. evil argument (which is another post entirely) aside, characters are far more interesting when built up from a set of values and experiences rather than constructed from an archetype down.

Start with the small details - your character's favorite food, musical tastes, weather. Begin creating a personality, add in background events (which should always be more mundane than the events experienced in-game) and adapt their personality to show how these past events have influenced their current position.

How your character acts and the profession your character takes should always be the last part of your creation process. Everything else about them - their set of values and experiences - should dictate these; not the other way around.

For those of you who like to take roleplaying from a mere hobby to a method of gaining personal insight, I'd suggest you take a look at the Aristotelean concept of eudaimonia. It may prove incredibly valuable to your character creation process.

Best,
Edward Falconer
The Cathyle Project
Falconer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2003, 12:11 AM   #12
John
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 252
John is on a distinguished road
I agree with Falconer. Only I tend to work out who my parents are, then who raised me, who my friends were in my childhood, how I acted, how I act now, what I like/don't like. In that order.

I enjoy playing char's who'll be involved in politics. How they're involved in politics is completely different everytime. I've had people who'd collect rumors and sell them, I've had people who would just do whatever they're told and not think for themselves. All sorts really. However I always die.......

I tend to play the char's no-one notices. I'll rarely be in the spotlight, but more be like the person that just stands in the background and helps leaders pull of their plans.
John is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2003, 08:28 AM   #13
JilesDM
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 66
JilesDM is on a distinguished road
I find it extremely useful to sketch out a rough outline of the personality I plan to play, e.g., slightly insane paranoid, eccentric genius with delusions of grandeur, angsty manic depressive, or unmotivated slob with a big mouth. The concept of personality type is completely orthogonal with respect to profession or class (assuming class is even a valid concept on the MU* in question).

I think you're mistaking using the concept of character personality with rehashing tired cliched archetypes, which are generally a combination of personality and profession.
JilesDM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2003, 03:10 PM   #14
Falconer
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Paris
Posts: 35
Falconer is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to Falconer
Quote:
Originally Posted by
I find it extremely useful to sketch out a rough outline of the personality I plan to play, e.g., slightly insane paranoid, eccentric genius with delusions of grandeur, angsty manic depressive, or unmotivated slob with a big mouth.
This is an excellent place to start - concentrating on the various personality quirks that will begin to define your character. Characters with reasons behind these personality traits are infinitely more interesting than those with just the traits themselves.

Consider, for example, the character of Hamlet. You could certainly start by brainstorming a list of personality traits: eccentric, drowning in melancholy, suicidal, unable to form true bonds of intimacy. But when you begin to add the motivations - the experiences and life events that have shaped these traits - immediately the character takes on an extra dimension and gains a prop of personal history to use in present and future roleplaying scenarios.

Quote:
Originally Posted by
I think you're mistaking using the concept of character personality with rehashing tired cliched archetypes, which are generally a combination of personality and profession.
No. These cliched archetypes are simply an exaggerated example of characters built on expressed traits rather than internal motivations.

A reference that may be of help is acting trainer Constantine Stanislavski's book An Actor Prepares. I've included a link to amazon.com's description and ordering information for those who are interested.

An Actor Prepares

Best,
Edward Falconer
The Cathyle Project
Falconer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2003, 06:10 AM   #15
Lindahl
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: California, US
Posts: 5
Lindahl is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by
I played once with a serial-killer that was killing women and taking parts of their bodies in order to create himself the perfect bride.
Ahh... a trip down memory lane.


Just kidding! (couldn't resist)
Lindahl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2003, 11:24 AM   #16
OnyxFlame
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 153
OnyxFlame is on a distinguished road
Post

The purpose of this thread wasn't to drown in stereotypes, but to figure out what personalities people like to play, and how similar they are to the personalities of the people who play them.

I do tend to play mages most of the time, mainly because I prefer the mechanics, and because on the mud I play mages have more opportunity to be social than fighters. But any of my char personalities could work equally well with fighters, if I happened to want to play one. I don't think a mage's personality should be different than a fighter's, just because one's a mage and one's a fighter, and that wasn't what I meant with this thread anyway.

When I create a char, I do at least enough of their history to explain how they got to where the game dumps out newbies, and develop it more as time and circumstance allows. Then I figure out how my char reacted to events in their history, and how it flavors their interactions in the world today.

For instance, my current char is an attempt to take the old orphan thing and make it fresh and nonstereotypical. Very few people actually know her history, but it flavors everything she does. She's not the pity-me orphan, she's more like the ask-me-and-I'll-blow-you-up orphan. She tends to go back and forth between trusting no one, and wanting so badly to find companionship that she'll do almost anything. Sometimes she's overly grim and pessimistic, sometimes she's bouncy and jokes around in order to hide her true feelings. She tends to baby her close friends and give them teaching and such, but she's extremely evil and ruthless to her enemies. It takes a long time for her to truly care about someone and trust them, and sometimes it never gets past the you're-an-idiot-and-you-suck-ass stage. She's pretty nosy, but she likes to have secrets and will faithfully keep others' secrets unless she believes it necessary to reveal them in order to keep someone she cares about from dying. And yet she condoned the death of her cousin (another PC), her last living and accessable family member, because of what he'd done.

So I don't think I get too much into stereotypes. In fact my chars tend to be complex to the point that different groups of people will see totally different aspects of their personality.
OnyxFlame is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2003, 02:10 PM   #17
Falconer
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Paris
Posts: 35
Falconer is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to Falconer
Quote:
Originally Posted by
The purpose of this thread wasn't to drown in stereotypes,
Quote:
Originally Posted by
I do tend to play mages most of the time, mainly because I prefer the mechanics, and because on the mud I play mages have more opportunity to be social than fighters.
Exactly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by
When I create a char, I do at least enough of their history to explain how they got to where the game dumps out newbies, and develop it more as time and circumstance allows. Then I figure out how my char reacted to events in their history, and how it flavors their interactions in the world today.
This is an approach that I've seen a multitude of players take, and it seems to be one that works. Often times, the flash of satori that helps a player to develop their character's background is spurred and assisted by the interactivity on a MU*. On the other hand, this can be an excuse and an escape for players that often results in either melodrama or an unconvincing character. Take, for example, a character who has not charted out a personal history and has verbally assaulted a character of a higher rank (because the player has defined their 'personality' as subordinate.)
When arrested or questioned by the authority, the player decides that their must be reasons why their character is in trouble and creates a scenario where the character suffered abuse in the past which is the reason for being a subordinate. The result is melodramatic and contrived - I've seen it happen multiple times on the three RP MU*s that I served as an RPA on and I'm comitted to having my players avert this with The Cathyle Project.

How? There's a plethora of methods that the administration of a game environment can take to ensuring that the characters in their realm are well thought-out ahead of time. The traditional (and simplest) method is to install an application-based creation system. This works well - it weeds out players based on stereotypes and ensures that they are creating a character pertinent to the thematic information provided. It also can have negative side-effects, from a diminished playerbase to what newbies (both to the game and roleplaying in general) will describe as an 'elitist environment.'

So there's other methods:
1) Ensure that you have provided plenty of thematic information on your website, within helpfiles and other foyers accessible to new players. Give a history, show varying factions and organizations, emphasize what makes your theme specifically different from the stock. For reference: Armaggedon RPI, Outremer MUX and Wes Platt's Join the Saga worlds all do an outstanding job of this.

2) Incorporate this thematic information into the character creation process. If you aren't using an application-based system, it's neccessary to weave thematic documents into the creation process. This also makes the process of learning about a world interactive - a technique that always builds player interest - especially if they feel that the information gleaned from reading will help them make better choices for their character.

3) Provide them with an instant roleplaying opportunity. Whether this is by flagging willing players as RP/Newbie emissaries, having a staff member contact the new player when they enter the game, or placing characters in an RP-intensive area/room when they begin, the intial RP scenario is invaluable. It allows new players to ask questions (both IC and OOC) and provides an example of the RP atmosphere that they're expected to fit into.

I apologize for side-tracking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by
So I don't think I get too much into stereotypes. In fact my chars tend to be complex to the point that different groups of people will see totally different aspects of their personality.
This thread might be better named: desribe one of your favorite characters. And no, it isn't a matter of simple semantics.
Falconer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2003, 07:10 PM   #18
Kallekins
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 48
Kallekins is on a distinguished road
First, on the original topic of the post:
I try to make my chars as different from me as possible. That is the challenge of roleplaying. I tend to favor happy-go-lucky types. They're just a lot more fun to be, and it is a game! When I have a char that is more melancholy, or if something sad for her is going on in game, I just find myself not really wanting to play. Bitter and passionately angry can also be fun (if exhausting). I just steer clear of depressed.
There are always some aspects of my personality that I can't quite weed out of my chars, quirks that I don't even notice, being brilliant also the rp style. I guess I do decently at it, since people generally have much difficulty guessing my alts.
On good vs evil duality:
Good vs evil can work as a theme, especially on a fantasy mud. It is a standard element in high fantasy, and it works for a lot of excellent literature, providing a driving force for the protagonist and a sense of importancy. I just dislike when muds have coded alignment, and enforce rp to follow their ideals of what 'good' and 'evil' should act like. And I dislike when people play evil like they know they are evil, cackling and smiling darkly and going mwahahaha. Evil people should think they are good and the good people are evil, and both sides do evil things to achieve what they believe are good.
On archetypes:
Archetypes also have their roots in good literature, because they do work. I don't think it is so bad to base a char on an archetype (depending on just how tired it is) as long as they expand, twist, or somehow change it to make it a little different. The most important shaping events that define your char should happen in-game, and you should always be willing to change, to be shaped by what happens. Start simple, grow complex.
On a side topic:

3) Provide them with an instant roleplaying opportunity.  Whether this is by flagging willing players as RP/Newbie emissaries, having a staff member contact the new player when they enter the game, or placing characters in an RP-intensive area/room when they begin, the intial RP scenario is invaluable.  It allows new players to ask questions (both IC and OOC) and provides an example of the RP atmosphere that they're expected to fit into.
(um, this is supposed to be a quote from Falconer, but I have no idea how to make the quotes work so I apoligise if it isn't proper)
I so totally agree with this. I've quit what are probably very good RPI's just from not having anything to do. Especially if it is a game without quests or much combat, a newbie can find herself with nothing to do before getting the "in" with the rp cliques. But this is something more for the players to do than the staff. Spend more time in public areas, especially those near where newbies enter. Clans or guilds should appoint liasons to convert and brainwash the young. And don't think you are helping newbies by giving them money or taking them hunting. It is much more valuable to roleplay with them, even by being mean. Make them feel like part of the world, take them seriously, and give them a reason to keep playing.
Kallekins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2003, 05:17 AM   #19
Aeneas
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 2
Aeneas is on a distinguished road
I play serious (or so i am told) characters only. While we have align imped, i do actually look little at it (mostly eq). I play calm and resourceful guys mostly. Rarely really angered and even when do usually calm down fast. OH, and their lazy and love to talk (and argue according to some).Due to that their fairly social and deal with others with respect, unless the person has done something my char disapproves.
† † Where they mostly differ. One takes bride in his abilities, and likes to challenge other players, he is also slightly paranoid about losing. Another likes to be cryptic; give help in the forms of hints, riddles and counter questions. He hates not knowing about things, and feels great satisfaction about knowing things most dont.
† As of background, i make them related to the realm. Never royal, however also not bakers etc. They have natural wish to adventure. That does not mean necessary like take your stuff and leave home, mostly actually forced due to some (bad) events.
Aeneas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-07-2003, 06:16 AM   #20
ManiacMana
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Romania
Posts: 3
ManiacMana is on a distinguished road
I love RPG's and I played many.My style is quite clear:my chars are good mages.The thing that made me post here is that the discussion has started in a certain way and it became about good vs. evil.I have some words to say about this:there IS good and evil but the most important thing is that a character should be able to get from evil to good ONLY by redemption.The classification of good or evil chars should be done by the way they perform they're deeds and if a good char has done ONE evil deed he/she/it should automaticly become evil
ManiacMana is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


What's your "style"? - Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
nethack style overhead maps surfdaddy Advertising for Players 5 01-14-2007 07:56 PM
MMORPG-Style Forgotten Realms MUD Seeking Staff gicker Advertising for Staff 1 06-24-2004 08:06 PM
A matter of style, or taste. Trireld MUD Builders and Areas 4 01-28-2004 08:33 AM
New Game, New Style Amnon Advertising for Players 0 09-28-2003 06:53 AM
"24" OtherSpace-style - Dec. 14, 2002 Brody Advertising for Players 0 10-25-2002 09:52 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Style based on a design by Essilor
Copyright Top Mud Sites.com 2014